Luiz Fernando Ramos: USP SPECTRESS Fellow in Dublin

I choose to develop my research with the SPECTRESS Project at the Trinity College Dublin, and was kindly received by Jennifer Edmond, who offered me ideal conditions for working on my research on W.B. Yeats’ theatre. I was looking for to find out whether the Easter Rising, as a tremendous historical event, reverberated as a traumatic experience forcing the poet’s option for a more abstract and stylized theatre, mainly expressed in his four “Plays for Dancers”.

The Winding Stair, the best restaurant of Dublin.

The Winding Stair, the best restaurant of Dublin.

Sun set on the Liffey, Dublin.

Sun set on the Liffey, Dublin.


I was blessed by the timing of the trip, from January to March 2016. I could observe in a very comfortable and focused manner, how Irish society and the city of Dublin, a true jewel of the European community, prepared for the centenary of the Easter Rising, touchstone of the independent Irish Republic. The events related to this rebellion from the English domination were concentrated between 24 and 29 of April 1916. One hundred years after, the celebration of this starting point of what is today Ireland began in early January, coinciding with my arrival, and I had the opportunity of reading about that facts in special newspaper editions, watching TV series and films from the Dublin Cinema Festival reconstituting the fights, and attending productions from the Gate and The Abbey Theatre of plays from the main Irish dramatists on the matter, besides having at my disposal in Trinity dozens of lectures and debates about it.
Living in a small nice flat in the charming neighbourhood of Ranelagh, I was in a walking distance from the Trinity College and from the National Library, the two places that I daily visited, but had also much time for leisure, like watching the wonderful low skyline of Dublin from the bridges over the Liffey. It was winter time, which, for a Brazilian tired from the heat, can be very suitable, and was also able to travel a week through the Wild Atlantic Way, from up north to down south of the Island.

Pond in Ranelagh, Dublin

Pond in Ranelagh, Dublin

Sliabh Liag, Donegal

Sliabh Liag, Donegal


My research on Yeats has had a great improvement not just in the explorations of the links between the poet and the National cause, as well on his genuine point of view during the Independence War years, but also in his specific relationship with the British artist Gordon Craig (1782-1966), who had very much influenced the Irish poet in his drives towards the stage designing and to a more physical and material approach to the theatre.
I must thank very much Jennifer, Deirdre and Sarah, who guided me in the Trinity’s Long Room Hub, where I worked mostly, but especially Jane Ohlmeyer, Director of the Hub, whose warm hospitality made the difference in turning the whole experience a lovely one.

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About Jennifer Edmond

Dr Jennifer Edmond, is the Director of Strategic Projects in the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Trinity College Dublin. Trained as a scholar of German literature, Jennifer is mostly engaged professionally with the investigation of knowledge exchange and collaboration in Humanities research and in particular the impact of technology on these processes.
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